As the temperatures warm and the pollen gets thicker you have noticed more flying pests around your house, decks, porches, boathouses, storage sheds, and garages.

This is the time of year when these flying nuisance and stinging creatures begin to come alive and flourish. Colonies and nests become active and new members are being born.

It’s also the time of year when flowers, azaleas, and other flowering shrubs are blooming. Their pollen is like a huge “FREE Sale” sign for flying insects needing pollen.

If you’ve ever been stung by a wasp, hornet or yellow jacket you know the pain and misery they can cause. More serious, those who are allergic to any type of bee sting are at risk of having serious allergic reactions, anaphylaxis shock among them. This is not just “another” bee sting to those who are allergic. Their eyes, ears, and throats swell closing off vital airways.

Now is the time to make sure your Epi-pen prescriptions are up to date and restocked. Put one in the boat, the car, golf bag and near the back porch, or deck. If you are highly allergic pick up some insect repellent for humans and clothing. DEET is the best, but there are plenty of natural repellents containing lemongrass and citronella oils too. Apply them liberally if you are going to be outdoors for ann length of time. Avoid spraying your face, nose, and eyes. This is the first line of defense to ward off a potential stinging attacker.

Around the house, ThermaCELL devices/torches, as well as citronella torches help keep your patio, pool, or deck pleasant in the evening. These are affordable things everyone can do to prevent these annoying insects.

Carpenter bees are active. While they are not aggressive the females will sting if they are threatened or agitated. The males do not have a stinger. Carpenter bees bore holes in soft, wet, or damp wood found in porches, decks, garages and storage buildings. Like, termites they love damp wood. However, they are very destructive. They can bore holes up to ½ to ¾’s of an inch then lay their eggs inside your walls, joists, ceilings, eaves and just about any place there is damp, softwood. They will not leave until their eggs are born. Once in your home, they can do a lot of damage. If you see wood shavings on the ground around your home like someone drilled into wood and didn’t clean it up you may have them. Other signs include buzzing, or noise come from your walls and holes in your siding, or exposed wood. You will also see them flying around eaves, awnings, elevated decks, or porches. A professional technician can assess if you have carpenter bees, recommend a plan for treatment and help so you can enjoy your home in the warm months. Treatment may involve a pesticide, sealing up any potential opening or crack around the home with access to wood with foam, or caulk cutting off their access.

If you have wasps nests, hornets, or yellow jackets you may need to call a professional exterminator. Technicians are trained in dealing with these and other flying, stinging insects. They will safely remove any nests. They will treat your exterior areas and ground where necessary to prevent reinfestation.

At Apex Termite & Pest Control we have three generations of experience in termite and the pest control business. We understand wasps, hornets, yellow jackets and more. We live and work in the Upstate and like you, we want to enjoy our homes in Spring and Summer. We care about our customers and count it a privilege to provide relief so they can enjoy their homes in warmer months. We are in the business of providing peace of mind for homeowners.

Contact us today for more information on termite bonds, treatment, and inspections.

apex termite and pest controlAustin Hamilton
General Manager Apex Termite & Pest Control
(864) 877-2702
Austin@apex-termite.com

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